“….And Here’s Bing” 

 

Bing Crosby – The Radio Directories compiled by Lionel Pairpoint. Originally published in July, 2000 as a limited edition and now out of print.

 

The International Club Crosby is placing this magnificent book detailing Bing’s radio career onto the Internet as a tribute to Lionel who died in January, 2005. This is an updated version of the original book as Lionel had been making additions as new information had come to light and we have continued this. The photo shows Lionel (right) being presented with a bound copy of his book by Michael Crampton of the ICC in October 2000.

 

 

CONTENTS – click on the links below to access

 

Author’s Notes

Bibliography

Prelude

Old Gold Presents Paul Whiteman and his Orchestra 1929-1930

                        - directory

                        - indices

Bing goes solo

Presenting 15 minutes with Bing Crosby 1931

Bing Crosby – Cremo Singer 1931-32

-    directory

-          indices

Sundry Radio Appearances 1932

Chesterfield Cigarettes presents Music That Satisfies 1933

-          directory

-         indices

Sundry Radio Appearances 1933

Bing Crosby Entertains (the Woodbury series) 1933-1935

-         directory 1933-1934 season

-         directory 1934-1935 season

Sundry Radio Appearances 1933-1935

Bing Crosby – The Kraft Music Hall

-         directory 1935-1936 season (show Nos. 1-35)

-         directory 1936-1937 season (show Nos. 36-73)

-         directory 1937-1938 season (show Nos. 74-115)

-         directory 1938-1939 season (show Nos. 116-151)

-         directory 1939-1940 season (show Nos. 152-196)

-         directory 1940-1941 season (show Nos. 197-231)

-         directory 1941-1942 season (show Nos. 232-262)

-         directory 1942-1943 season (show Nos. 263-291)

-         directory 1943-1944 season (show Nos. 292-344)

-         directory 1944-1945 season (show Nos. 345-372)

-         directory 1946 season (show Nos. 373-387)

-         indices

Armed Forces Radio Service 1942-1977

-         introduction

-         Command Performance USA!

-         directory

-         indices

-         Mail Call

-         directory

-         indices

-         G. I. Journal

-         directory

-         indices

Sundry Guest Appearances 1936-1946

Philco Radio Time 1946-1949

-         directory 1946-1947 season (show Nos. 1-36)

-         directory 1947-1948 season (show Nos. 37-72)

-         directory 1948-1949 season (show Nos. 73-108)

-         indices

Sundry Guest Appearances 1946-1949

The Bing Crosby Show for Chesterfield 1949-1952

-         directory 1949-1950 season (show Nos. 1-36)

-         directory 1950-1951 season (show Nos. 37-74)

-         directory 1951-1952 season (show Nos. 75-113)

-         indices

Sundry Guest Appearances 1949-1952

The Bing Crosby Show for General Electric 1952-1954

-         directory 1952-1953 season (show Nos. 1-39)

-         directory 1953-1954 season (show Nos. 40-75)

-         indices

Sundry Guest Appearances 1952-1954

The Final Radio Years 1954-1962

The Bing Crosby Show 1954-1956 and index

The Ford Road Show 1957-1958 and index

The Bing Crosby-Rosemary Clooney Show 1960-1962 and index

Bing and Buddy Cole Library

Sundry Guest Appearances 1955-1977

 

Author’s Notes

It seems that these directories have taken most of my life to prepare and sometimes I believe I would have been better employed, working in a mattress factory.  I have wandered down countless blind alleys, reversed into innumerable brick walls and with some notable exceptions, most frustratingly of all, have encountered a stony silence, when I have called upon some of the scions of Crosbyana for information.  Fortunately, I am still able to publish a list of ‘credits’ and I am indebted to the following, Ron Bosley, Charlie Campbell, Philip R. Evans, Gary Hamann, Ralph Harding, David W. McCain, Malcolm & Pat Macfarlane, George O’Reilly,  Joyce Pairpoint, Jim Reilly, Greg Van Beek, E. Scott Whalen and Wig Wiggins.  Some of these are acknowledged for their knowledge of matters concerning Bing Crosby, some for their unqualified support and assistance and others for their forbearance of a hobby that has got completely out of hand!  There may be those who would have preferred not to have their names associated with this enterprise and here, I should point out that any opinions expressed or errors perpetrated in the main directories are my responsibility, alone.

This is not intended to be ‘Bing Crosby For Dummies’.  If you are reading this, it is fairly safe to assume that you will probably know more than a little about the man and his background.  I hesitate to make any sweeping claims on his behalf.  I am not even going to suggest that he was the greatest singer of popular songs that ever lived, in the certain knowledge that, on this point, he would have agreed with me.  I have only a personal statement to make ‘he had the ability to sing the songs that I enjoyed, in the manner in which I liked to hear them’.

From the outset, he displayed a universal appeal. His endeavours in every chosen medium reached the heights. His record sales are still, legend.  In the main, his movies were lightweight and required no profound thought process to be enjoyed but enjoyed they were, establishing him as a top box office star for over fifteen years.  There is no need to go too far out on a limb to say that the fountainhead of his success was radio and that he was the first popular singer to benefit from the world‑wide representation offered by the medium. Without pretentious vocal gymnastics, he had a fundamental ability to make the most prosaic lyric sound as though he meant every word that he was singing and he portrayed a relaxed, easy‑going persona that would prove to be a boon to his script writers.

The claim that, over a long period, Crosby’s voice was, ‘the most heard voice in the world’ cannot be dismissed as extravagant ‘hype’ when it is remembered that, in addition to his own, long running, weekly radio series, many stations, world wide, ran complete programmes, composed entirely of his recordings.  Some were enterprising (or devious), enough to insinuate to the listeners that what they were hearing was live, as the following quote from ‘Variety’ of 29th April 1936 will illustrate, ‘¼copy has the announcer open periods, hailing them as entertainment by Crosby and then mumbling the word ‘recordings’.  From then on the warbler is addressed as though he were delivering songs in the flesh.  Sample spiels: ‘Well, Bing, what are you going to sing for us today?¼.Let’s see now.  I notice we have you down to give us your rendition of …….. (and at the record’s conclusion):  Fine work, Bing.  You were never in better voice, etc., etc.’ (And then as the programme nears end):  ‘Just have time for one chorus of Bing’s next song’ (Then after orchestra on record barely gets through the opening bars) ‘Sorry, Bing; we just couldn’t squeeze that one in.  We’ll have to do it on tomorrow’s programme’.’

As well as a massive proliferation of these ‘platter’ programmes, there were guest appearances on the radio series of others.  There were countless interviews, examining his film and recording career, his sporting and business interests and his private life.  He participated in star‑studded celebrations of, not only his own anniversaries but also those of other personalities, including, presidents, composers and even the radio networks, themselves. There were sporting commentaries, Bond Drives, Christmas Seal Campaigns, propaganda broadcasts and charity appeals for the Red Cross, religious institutions, medical research and Boys’ Clubs.   Both before and after his death, bulky radio biographies were compiled of his life and times and indeed, it will be a ‘black’ Christmas should his voice not be heard on radio at that season of the year. 

I am indebted to Malcolm Macfarlane for his work in supplying a representative catalogue of many of the guest appearances.  Although sections of these Directories are still incomplete, every known piece of information has been included and for the sake of posterity, I can only hope that others will step forward and add their greater knowledge to anything that has been set down here.

 

The Programmes

These directories detail in chronological order, every programme of the various series.  To facilitate reference, the programmes have been numbered consecutively within the dates of the original broadcasts. It should be noted that Bing Crosby’s name has been accorded priority in musical items and/or sketches, no matter how small his contribution to such items may have been.  Those items in which he participated are indicated by an asterisk (*).  No special reference has been made to the spoken commercials featured in these programmes, although Bing may have been involved in these.

 

The Songs

Considerable research has been undertaken and a great many authoritative publications have been consulted to ensure that song titles are correctly quoted.  However, minor differences have been noted in works of reference on the subject and in these cases, the compiler’s discretion has been observed.

 

The Notes

The dividing line between the so‑called ‘commercial’ and ‘non‑commercial’ output of Bing Crosby has become increasingly narrow.  In addition to privately issued discs and tapes which have been issued over the years, both major and smaller record companies have already issued many titles which do not appear in the already completed discographies.  For the sake of clarity, these radio excerpts which have been issued will be described as non‑commercial and the aim of this Directory is to assist in the identification of this material.

An endeavour has been made to detail as many of the non‑commercial issues, as possible which have featured excerpts or complete shows from the series but it should be appreciated that these are only representative examples of the material which has been available.  It is realised that there are some issues and equivalents which are not shewn herein but the compiler has not felt justified in including items which have not been, personally checked.

Commencing in October 1946, complete versions of every programme from the various series, (albeit in less than pristine condition), exist and for these, the notes have been expanded to incorporate the dates of the commercial versions of songs sung by Bing Crosby. These have been included for the purposes of comparison only and it should be noted that the broadcast items may not necessarily conform either in style or accompaniment with those commercially issued.

Other notes have been designed to facilitate identification, impart information or provoke discussion but it should be noted that, the compilation of the directories has been extended over more years than was originally intended and the reader may find notes more tentative, as the inevitable ‘jiggery‑pokery’ associated with professional tape‑recording and its subsequent editing became increasingly apparent.

 

IMPORTANT – PLEASE NOTE

The Indices

Please be advised that the indices are not ‘computer ‑generated’ which, it is considered, leads to annoying and unnecessary anomalies.

To illustrate; ‘The Music Master Tracks Catalogue’ contains, no less than ten, separate, entries for Duke Ellington’s, ‘Do Nothin’ Till You Hear From Me’.  This has been caused by the incorrect use or, total absence of apostrophes, coupled with minor spelling errors; ‘til is OK but til’ is not and ‘till’ doesn’t need an apostrophe, at all and we can suppose that any keyboard wizard might fall victim to the aberration of substituting, ‘here’ for ‘hear’.

Consequently, the more ‘classic’ style, as favoured by dictionaries, encyclopaedias, telephone directories etc., has been preferred and entries are listed alphabetically, letter by letter, ignoring all punctuation marks and spacing and not, merely, word by word.  Accordingly, ‘It Had To Be You’ precedes, ‘I Thought About You’ which, itself, precedes, ‘It Looks Like Rain In Cherry Blossom Lane’.  In addition, the English articles, ‘a’ and ‘the’ do not precede the title and the position is governed by the first word following the said article e.g., ‘Man And His Dream, A’ or, ‘Funny Old Hills, The’.  Nevertheless, when the plural articles, commence a title, they will appear first, as in. ‘These Things You Left Me’ or ‘Those Endearing Young Charms’.  However, when the language used is other than English, the article will appear first e.g., ‘La Rhumba’ or,  ‘El Choclo

 

N.B. REFERENCES SHEWN ARE PROGRAMME NUMBERS AND NOT PAGE NUMBERS!


All series covered, have at least two indexes:

 

Index 1

Lists, alphabetically, the songs or musical items in which Bing Crosby participated. 

As ‘Where The Blue Of The Night’ appears in almost every programme in most series, this item has been omitted from the index except where it may have appeared other than as an opening or closing theme.

 

Index 2

Lists, alphabetically, the songs or musical items performed solely by guests during the programmes.

 

The Kraft Music Hall, Command Performance, Mail Call, G. I. Journal, Philco Radio Time, Chesterfield and General Electric programmes have an additional index:

 

Index 3

Details, alphabetically, the people and places concerned in the programmes. 

There are obvious omissions.  In the later series, the names of Bing Crosby, John Scott Trotter, Bill Morrow, Murdo MacKenzie and Ken Carpenter (with a few exceptions) were associated with every programme and have been excluded.

 

Finally, from the commencement of Philco Radio Time through to the final programme of the General Electric series, a further index has been included:

 

Index 4

It is appreciated that Bing sang the same song on more than one occasion during a series and this section has been designed as an additional aid to the identification of these alternative versions which already have been (or may later be), issued on record, tape or compact disc.  It is emphasised that this index only applies to items originating within the radio series to which it refers and no provision has been made for versions of the same songs which may have appeared on any other radio series with which Bing Crosby may have been associated. 

 

All songs are referred to according to their Programme number and explanations have been kept as brief as possible and although some versions may have many differences, an attempt has been made to point out the earliest or most salient of these variations. Reference to the main directory will often provide sufficient information to facilitate identification but for the sake of completeness, all items have been included.  It will be appreciated that the problems posed in the compilation of such an index are considerable, covering broadcast selections from radio series which spanned nine separate years. Obviously, matrix and/or take numbers, so useful as an initial reference point in the identification of commercial issues, have not applied and all comparisons have been made by aural examination of taped copies, many of which have been of dubious fidelity.  Additional hazards have been encountered in the form of examples of editing which have artificially created, ‘different’ versions of songs.  How prevalent this practice became or to what lengths it was taken, it is impossible to say and at this point, it would be as well to mention that the phrases, ‘longer version’ and ‘shorter version’ are used, in the index, as a means of identification but it should not be overlooked that a ‘shorter’ version may merely be an abridgement of the ‘longer’ version.  In the event, it should be noted that the main aim of the index has been to link an excerpt with the actual broadcast date, regardless of whether the item had previously been aired, in any other form during the series. 

Another complication has had to be considered.  It is realised that taped excerpts which require to be identified, may be many generations removed from the originals and will inevitably exhibit variations in speed which would further confuse comparison. The method of identification has therefore been, necessarily, limited.  The majority of differences noted have had to be ‘word’ differences.  On only a very few occasions has a variation been noted on a ‘time elapsed’ basis and in these instances, the differences have been considered conspicuous enough to justify their inclusion.

On many occasions, reference may have been made to Bing’s characteristic practice of vocally, ‘breaking’, one syllable into two separate syllables, known, popularly, as ‘the Crosby bubble’ or more technically, ‘a mordent’ or ‘inverted mordent’  (e.g. ‘for‑or’, ‘a‑and’) and once again, this device has only been employed where the difference is regarded as unmistakable.

In most duets it is assumed that recognition of the named partner will provide positive identification but it has also been borne in mind that this may be hampered by poor sound quality and where confusion may arise, further points of comparison have been noted.

Researchers may be disappointed to find that on many occasions, the phrases, ‘no identifiable differences’ or ‘no definable differences’ have been used but it should be observed that this may simply mean that there are no easily explainable differences, using the criteria, already mentioned.  In these cases and bearing in mind that many excerpts, both on disc and tape, will retain fragments of introductory dialogue, the last few words of any spoken introduction, before the first line of the song, are shewn.

The legend ‘(1st)’ or ‘(2nd)’ etc, denotes that it is the first or second time that the word(s) or line(s) referred to have appeared during the song.

Finally, the process of identification may be assisted by comparison on an elimination basis, (e.g. if not version (a) then it must be either (b), (c) or (d).  If not version (b) then it must be either (c) or (d) and so on) and the index has been designed to a large extent, to support this process.

All songs are referred to according to their Programme number and explanations have been kept as brief as possible and although some versions may have many differences, an attempt has been made to point out the earliest or most salient of these variations. Reference to the main directory will often provide sufficient information to facilitate identification but for the sake of completeness, all items have been included.  It will be appreciated that the problems posed in the compilation of such an index are considerable, covering broadcast selections from radio series which spanned nine separate years.  Obviously, matrix and/or take numbers, so useful as an initial reference point in the identification of commercial issues, have not applied and all comparisons have been made by aural examination of taped copies, many of which have been of dubious fidelity.  Additional hazards have been encountered in the form of examples of editing which have artificially created, ‘different’ versions of songs.  How prevalent this practice became or to what lengths it was taken, it is impossible to say and at this point, it would be as well to mention that the phrases, ‘longer version’ and ‘shorter version’ are used, in the index, as a means of identification but it should not be overlooked that a ‘shorter’ version may merely be an abridgement of the ‘longer’ version.  In the event, it should be noted that the main aim of the index has been to link an excerpt with the actual broadcast date, regardless of whether the item had previously been aired, in any other form during the series. 

Another complication has had to be considered.  It is realised that taped excerpts which require to be identified, may be many generations removed from the originals and will inevitably exhibit variations in speed which would further confuse comparison. The method of identification has therefore been, necessarily, limited.  The majority of differences noted have had to be ‘word’ differences.  On only a very few occasions has a variation been noted on a ‘time elapsed’ basis and in these instances, the differences have been considered conspicuous enough to justify their inclusion.

On many occasions, reference may have been made to Bing’s characteristic practice of vocally, ‘breaking’, one syllable into two separate syllables, known, popularly, as ‘the Crosby bubble’ or more technically, ‘a mordent’ or ‘inverted mordent’  (e.g. ‘for‑or’, ‘a‑and’) and once again, this device has only been employed where the difference is regarded as unmistakable.

In most duets it is assumed that recognition of the named partner will provide positive identification but it has also been borne in mind that this may be hampered by poor sound quality and where confusion may arise, further points of comparison have been noted.

 

Bibliography

Barnes, Ken                                         The Crosby Years

Bishop, Bert & John Bassett                 Bing ‘ Just For The Record

Bloom, Ken                                          American Song ‘The Complete Musical Theatre Companion

                                                                                                            1877‑1995 

Bloom, Ken                                          Hollywood Song (3 Volumes)

Craig, Warren                                      Sweet And Lowdown

Crosby Bing with Pete Martin               Call Me Lucky            

Crosby, Gary                                       Going My Own Way

De Long, Thomas A.                            The Mighty Music Box

Dunning, John                                       The Encyclopaedia Of Old Time Radio

Eberly, R                                              Music In The Air  

Evans, Philip R. & Linda K.                  ‘Bix ’ The Leon Bix Beiderbecke Story

Evans, Philip R, Stephen & Stanley

            Hester, and Linda Evans.          The Red Nichols Story ‑ After Intermission 1942 ‑1965

Field, James J                                       The Book Of World Famous Music

Hamann, G.D.                                      Bing Crosby In The 30’s

Hamann, G.D.                                      Bing Crosby In The 40’s

Hamann, G.D.                                      Bing Crosby In The 50’s

Jacobs, Dick                                        Who Wrote That Song?

Henson, Brian & Colin Morgan             First Hits

Kiner, Larry F.                                     Bing Crosby ‘Cremo Singer’

Kiner, Larry F.                                     Bing Crosby ‘Music That Satisfies’

Kinkle, Roger D.                                  The Complete Encyclopædia Of Popular Music And Jazz

                                                                                    1900‑1950

Kolff, Frans W. van der                        Bing Crosby ‑ A Songography

Lax, Roger & Frederick Smith              The Great Song Thesaurus

Levine, Howard                                    The Kraft Music Hall Radio Program

Levine, Howard and Tony Sponarich    The Makers of Woodbury Facial Soap Present Bing Crosby

Lissauer, Robert                                   Lissauer’s Encyclopædia Of Popular Music In America

Lowe, Leslie                                         Music Master Directory  Of Popular Music

Macfarlane, Malcolm                            Bing - A Diary Of A Lifetime

MacKenzie, Harry                                Command Performance USA!

Pitts, Michael R.                                   Radio Soundtracks

Reynolds, Fred                                     The Crosby Collection (5 volumes)

Shapiro, Nat & Bruce Pollock              Popular Music

Shepherd, Don & Robert F. Slatzer      Bing Crosby ‘ The Hollow Man’

Thompson, Charles                               Bing

Whitburn, Joel                                      Pop Memories 1890‑1954

Whitburn, Joel                                      Pop Hits 1940‑1954

White, Mark                                         You Must Remember This - Popular Songwriters 1900‑1980

Wilk, Max                                            They’re Playing Our Song

 

Newspapers & Periodicals

BING

BINGANG

BINGtalks

Billboard

Boston Post

Chicago Daily Tribune

Los Angeles Times

Melody Maker

New Orleans Times‑Picayune

New York Herald Tribune

New York Times

Philadelphia Inquirer

Radio Times

San Francisco Chronicle

Saturday Evening Post

Variety

Washington Post

 

PRELUDE

Over many years, Lionel Pairpoint has been preparing this definitive tome of Bing’s major radio series starting with the Old Gold shows in 1929 and finishing with the General Electric series from the 1950s.  The depth of his research will become apparent as you read these volumes, and the indices where Lionel differentiates between various versions of the same song are quite simply breathtaking.  To have details of the Command Performance, Mail Call and G.I. Journal shows is a very welcome bonus too.  To supplement Lionel’s magnificent work, we have given brief details of Bing’s other radio appearances plus a schedule of the many songs recorded by Bing with Buddy Cole for use in various radios shows of the late 1950s and early 1960s.  But first, let’s set the scene.

Harry Lillis Crosby was born on May 3, 1903 and after picking up a childhood nickname of ‘Bing’ he was educated at Gonzaga High School in Spokane, Washington State.  He entered Gonzaga University in 1920 and when he reached his junior year in 1922 he elected to study law.  During his time at university he had become heavily involved in the Dramatic Club and enjoyed some success in several roles.  Singing in public had followed naturally and Bing soon became part of a small band called The Musicaladers.  His part time earnings from that source were greater than he was likely to earn as a lawyer and he dropped out of his University law course in the final year to follow a show business career.  When the Musicaladers disbanded, Bing and his friend Al Rinker entertained locally in the Spokane area as The Clemmer Entertainers for a while before travelling down to Los Angeles to seek their fortune.  The act, which was known as Crosby and Rinker, prospered and within a year, was signed up by Paul Whiteman, one of the biggest names in the entertainment world.  Early successes with the Whiteman organisation were followed by abject failure with the result that ‘Crosby and Rinker’ were amalgamated with another entertainer called Harry Barris and became The Rhythm Boys.  The trio was very popular on the vaudeville stage and on record, but then came radio.....

 

                                                                                                                                                                Malcolm Macfarlane

 

On January 4, 1928, the Paul Whiteman troupe starred in a nation‑wide broadcast over NBC which was sponsored by Dodge Brothers Automobile Company and known as the ‘Victory’ Hour.  Bing took part in this but was not mentioned much to the chagrin of his family listening in Spokane.  Radio was still in its infancy and Bing’s radio work until February 1929 when he joined Whiteman on the Old Gold Show can be summarised as follows.

 

1928

January 4 (10:30 ‑ 11:30 p.m.) The 'Victory' Hour. The band plays “Rhapsody In Blue”, “Among My Souvenirs” and “Changes”.

March 29 (9:00 – 10:00 p.m.) Whiteman takes part in a second Dodge Brothers radio show which is entitled ‘Film Star Radio Hour’. The Whiteman Orchestra plays “Chloe”, “Ramona”, “Mississippi Mud”, “My Heart Stood Still”, “Changes” and “Sunshine”. It is reasonable to assume that Bing participated in some of these.

May 1  Various Whiteman musicians take part in a one hour-and-twenty-minute remote broadcast from the Metropolitan Theatre over local Boston station WBET, beginning at 8:00 p.m., with Vernon “Bud” Gray as announcer. The programme was as follows:

 

*Wa-Da-Da                                                     The Rhythm Boys

  Valse Inspiration                                             Chester Hazlett—saxophone solo

  My Ohio Home                                              Austin “Skin” Young—Vocal Solo

  Midnight Reflections                                       Kurt Dieterle—Violinist, with Bargy, piano

  Among My Souvenirs                                    The Whiteman Trio—Fulton/Gaylord/Young

  Nanette / Rufenreddy                                     Roy Bargy—Piano Solo

  Together                                                         Jack Fulton—Vocal Solo

  Cradle Song                                                   Charlie Margulis—Trumpet Solo

*What Price Lyrics?                                         The Rhythm Boys

  Caprice Futuristic                                           Kurt Dieterle—Violin Solo

  In a Mist                                                         Bix Beiderbecke—Piano Solo

*From Monday On                                          The Rhythm Boys

  Trumbology                                                    Frank Trumbauer—Saxophone Solo

  La Gitana                                                       Kurt Dieterle—Violin solo

  More Than Anybody                                     Harry Barris and “Skin” Young—Vocal Duet

  Charmaine                                                      Boyce Cullen—Trombone Solo

 

May 8 Various Whiteman musicians take part in a second remote broadcast from the Metropolitan Theatre over local Boston station WBET, beginning at 8:15 p.m., with Vernon “Bud” Gray again as announcer. The programme was as follows:

 

*That's Grandma                                              The Rhythm Boys

  Wings of Song                                                Mischa Russell—Violin Solo

  She's the Sweetheart of Six Other Guys          Harry “Goldie” Goldfield—Comedy Song

  Saxophone Solo                                             Chester Hazlett

  Diane                                                             Austin "Skin" Young—Vocal Solo

  Metropolitan                                                   Harry Barris (p), Wilbur Hall / Al Rinker (tb)

                                                                                    (Instrumental novelty—dedicated to Bud Gray)

*I Wanna Woman                                            The Rhythm Boys

  Popular medley selections                               Mario Perry—Accordion

  Vocal Solo                                                     Austin “Skin” Young—accomp. himself on banjo

  Waltz Eureka                                                  Wilbur Hall—Trombone Solo

  Alice Blue / Heliotrope                                    Roy Bargy—Piano Solo

  My Heart Stood Still                                       The Whiteman Trio—Fulton/Gaylord/Young

  An American Piece                                         Kurt Dieterle—Violin Solo

  Together                                                         Henry Busse—Trumpet Solo

  Too Much Banjo                                            Mike Pingitore—Banjo Solo

  Diane / Gypsy Sweetheart                               Boyce Cullen—Trombone Solo

*Mississippi Mud”                                            The Rhythm Boys

  The Sunshine Of Your Smile                           Mike Pingitore—Banjo Specialty

  Piano Solo                                                      Lennie Hayton

  Nocturne                                                        Kurt Dieterle—Violin Solo

 

June 19 “Sixty Magic Minutes with Paul Whiteman” - another nation‑wide broadcast featuring the Whiteman orchestra takes place over NBC and the Rhythm Boys sing ‘That’s Grandma’ and ‘Wa-Da-Da’.

 

Go to Old Gold Presents Paul Whiteman and his Orchestra 1929-1930

 

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